McGee and Me Publishing

Christ-Centered Recovery Tools . . . and More!

Jack Watts has an A.B., from Georgia State University; an M.A., from Baylor University; and has completed everything except for his dissertation for a Ph.D. from Emory University. He has worked for nearly three decades in marketing, serving Christian ministries and publishers. Jack has five children and nine grandchildren.

 

Recovering from Religious Abuse: 11 Steps to Spiritual Freedom

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Recovering from Religious Abuse: 11 Steps to Spiritual Freedom

12.99

There is Nothing Like Recovering from Religious Abuse

I wrote Recovering from Religious Abuse because, until now, there has been nothing that addresses the problem, while also offering a solution for those victimized by it. Using an 11-step program, wounded Christians—those who have been used, abused, and discarded by self-righteous religious leaders—can reconnect with God in a healing, transforming way.

After being victimized, most wounded people lead half-lives, consumed with anger, bitterness, shame, and pain. They question whether the best years of their lives have already passed, hoping they haven’t but suspecting that they have. They are prone to depression and acting-out behavior, which includes over eating, over spending, alcoholism, drug addiction, pornography, promiscuity, and family dysfunction.

Recovering from Religious Abuse explains how the dynamics of religious abuse works but, more importantly, it details a method for the abused person to identify what has happened, while providing a way to achieve full recovery. The key is for the abused person to recognize that God still loves them just as much as ever and that they can once again experience love, joy, peace, patience, and serenity—not just occasionally but routinely.

If this has been your experience and you want to reconnect with God in a positive, meaningful way, you can. In a very short time—just ninety-one days—you can become stronger than you ever imagined possible, divesting yourself of the crippling chains that have imprisoned you since your abusive experience.

—Jack Watts

ISBN 978-1-4516-2632-2 Paperback

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Quite often we find that a religious abuse scandal has been splashed across the headlines. From the torment Elizabeth Smart endured during her capture by religious zealot Brian David Mitchell, to the allegations about Atlanta Bishop Eddie Long, it is no secret that religious abuse exists in the United States. However, there are many people who still internalize their abuse because it is a subject that religious leaders have historically refused to acknowledge. But even if the situation hasn’t made headlines, it doesn’t make it any less real or significant.

As Jack Watts proclaims in his new book, Recovering from Religious Abuse (Howard Books, February 2011), “Even if you consider your abuse to be minor, it still needs to be addressed.”

After being the victim of religious abuse himself and recognizing that millions of people have been wounded by religion, Watts has created a much needed recovery program in Recovering from Religious Abuse. Addressing those hurt by others in the church—psychologically, financially, or emotionally—Watts offers help for coming to terms with abuse, while also reconnecting with God in a rich, healing way—a way that restores purpose and meaning to life.

As a child and a young man, the author experienced multiple expressions of religious abuse, which led to self-destructive behaviors that nearly ruined his life. Through programs such as AA and the support of loving Christians, he has made significant progress toward recovery. However, Watts found that the particular effects of religious abuse needed a program far beyond what he had experienced, which led him to the creation of this 11-step program leading to spiritual freedom.

In Recovering from Religious Abuse, Watts provides a practical 11-step recovery program separated by weeks and days to include daily readings, prayer, journaling guidance, and Scriptures for reflection—all of which guide readers through a journey of understanding, healing, and lasting recovery. Topics include:

• Progress, not perfection

• Becoming who you really are

• The negative power of self-pity

• Repairing your relationship with God

• The purpose behind the pain

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